These Rare Discoveries Show Us The Other Story That Our History Books Never Did - The Naija Weekly

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Monday, August 24, 2020

These Rare Discoveries Show Us The Other Story That Our History Books Never Did


We want you to forget what your history books told you. They usually tell only one side of a story full of nuances. In this slideshow, you will learn about rare discoveries that showed the side of history that does not get told often. They peel back all these layers of stories you might have heard of and expose seldom told facts that will surely fascinate. Are you ready to hear the truth about events in history that you think you already know about?

A Mummified Monk Inside A Buddha Statue
In 2015, researchers from the Netherlands performed a CT scan on a sitting Buddha statue. Inside, they found things that they did not expect at all. The statue came with a mummified monk who had been in there for a millennium. Inside of simply putting the monk in there, researchers found out that he was full of scraps with Chinese characters on them. To mummify himself, the monk must have been placed on a special diet of toxic tea that would ensure that his body would become too toxic to be infested by maggots. Not many monks did this, but those who did were revered in their community.


A Green Stone Mask In Teotihuacán, Mexico
This curious green serpentine mask was found at the base of a Mexican pyramid in 2011. However, this was not the only thing the archaeologists saw there. They found the loot at the Teotihuacan Pyramid of the Sun, and it is believed that it was hidden there as an offering 2,000 years ago. Together with the mask, they found pottery and obsidian pieces right next to the human figurines of the same material. Archaeologists believe that the mask had been part of a ceremony since it was next to another offer.

A Green Stone Mask In Teotihuacán, Mexico

An Ottoman Supply Train Of The Hejaz Railway In The Desert
There were a lot of incredible feats of bravery that happened during the Great War. One of the most famous ones was that of T.E. Lawrence, better known as Lawrence of Arabia. He had been posted in the Middle East in 1917 when he started to topple the trains serving the Ottoman supply chain with a crew of Arabs. When the war came to a close, they had destroyed so much railroad and trains that they could no longer be used. Instead of moving the vacated trains, the Turkish people just abandoned them there.

An Ottoman Supply Train Of The Hejaz Railway In The Desert

Giant Japanese Spider Crabs
We know that these creatures look like they came straight from a ‘50s B-Movie, but we promise you that they are real. The crustaceans are found in the ocean near Japan, and they hold the record for the longest leg span of an arthropod. They are considered to be delicacies and can go as long as 18 feet! The crab itself can weigh as much as 42 lbs. You do not hear about them often since they reside in very deep holes in the ocean. They are only caught when they go looking for food outside their habitats, but the population has suffered greatly because of overfishing. This photo dates from 1904.

Giant Japanese Spider Crabs

Holy Roman Emperor Maximillian I Wore Armored Gloves Until His Death
These gauntlets were worn by Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I. They are a type of glove donned by knights and soldiers from different parts of the world during the Middle Ages. The metal gloves kept their forearms and hands safe, which was important as they are vulnerable in melee combat. There are different types of gauntlets, but these might be the most beautiful ones we have ever seen. These “war gloves” were made of leather, iron, or chain mail. This specific pair had been reportedly used by Maximillian I until he died in 1519. Did he wear them all the time or ever “threw down the gauntlet”? We do not know the answer to that one just yet.

Holy Roman Emperor Maximillian I Wore Armored Gloves Until His Death

The First Sunglasses Were Made By The Inuits
Many folks out there consider the sun to be the worst enemy of their eyesight, and for good reason. The first ones to use sunglasses had been the Inuits, who trudged through the snow over 4,000 years ago. The snow goggles prevented ultraviolet light from damaging their eyes and kept them from getting snow blindness. They invented the hand-carved goggles and left tiny slits so that they could still see through them. The thing that impressed modern researchers was that they did not fog over despite the polar conditions. The only drawback would be the fact that they significantly limited the vision of the wearer.

The First Sunglasses Were Made By The Inuits

Bernhardt Otto Holtermann With His 630-Lbs Gold Nugget
Bernhardt Otto Holtermann was born in Germany in 1838. He was a prospector who owned part of a claim in which rich gold veins were found after dry digging for years. He left for Sydney, Australia in an attempt to avoid service in the military. He spent years on end digging and was mostly unsuccessful. There was even a time when he blew himself up when the blasting powder exploded prematurely. This photo shows him right next to a huge “nugget” and was taken by an unnamed photographer right before he got elected to be a member of the St. Leonard’s parliament in 1882. He died at the age of 47.

Bernhardt Otto Holtermann With His 630-Lbs Gold Nugget

This Incredible Watch Was Made For Marie Antoinette
This is truly a pocket watch befitting of a Queen. The ornate watch had been commissioned by a mystery suitor of Marie Antoinette in 1783. They did not cut corners since they used gold instead of lesser metals. Overall, it must have cost him over $30 million! The gorgeous watch even came with a jumping hour hand, full calendar, 823 parts, and 23 complications. Considering these things, it is considered to be the 5th most complicated watch in history. The tragic part is that the recipient did not even receive the watch because it was only completed in 1827. That was 34 years after she had been guillotined!

This Incredible Watch Was Made For Marie Antoinette

World War II Meal Rations Came With Gum And Cigarettes
Most people would gladly take a break to go eat lunch. However, we doubt that soldiers looked forward to this time of the day during the Second World War. Soldiers often had to eat a K-ration instead, and it did not do the trick for most people. With that said, the set is full of some truly fascinating things at the very least. The crackers inside were often combined with whatever tinned meat was in the ration so that the soldiers can eat an open-faced sandwich. They also got a single piece of chocolate to enjoy. The rations came with anywhere from 2,500 to 3,000 calories. While they were considered to be rather calorific for the soldiers, the problem was that they did not change throughout the war.

World War II Meal Rations Came With Gum And Cigarettes

Antoine Fraveau Wore This Breastplate When He Died At The Battle of Waterloo
Antoine Fraveau had been in service to Napoleon during a skirmish at Waterloo. He was a young man when he was sent out to the field wearing this golden breastplate. Armor like this one had been very important to the soldiers of the 19th century since they protected one from blunt instruments and even swords. However, there was no way it could survive a cannonball attack! In 1815, he got blasted by cannon fire while in the middle of the fighting. He was reportedly getting ready for marriage before he died. This is an excellent way to demonstrate just how violent the Napoleonic Wars had been.

Antoine Fraveau Wore This Breastplate When He Died At The Battle of Waterloo

King Tutankhamun Wore Stylish And Royal Sandals

When people talk about ancient Egypt, the first things that come to mind would probably be mummies and pyramids. While they were important aspects of the culture, there is more to that period than that. The sandals worn by King Tut show that Ancient Egyptians were a lot like us than we thought. They did not only wear footwear similar to what we use, but they were also very interested in fashion. Ancient footwear expert André Veldmeije explained, “When footwear is mentioned in general books if at all, it is usually noted that sandals were flimsy and most people were barefoot all the time. Moreover, they say there were only a few types of sandals. This is a misconception, probably based on artistic depictions alone. The variety of footwear is much greater than imagery suggests and even includes shoes that are never depicted; we only know them from the archaeological record.”
King Tutankhamun Wore Stylish And Royal Sandals
The Wreckage Of A Kittyhawk P-40 In The Sahara Desert
The Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawk was like the British Tomahawk, the American fighter jet that debuted during the Second World War. The P-40 came with an Allison in-line piston engine that was able to go up to a speed of 378 miles per hour. It could achieve an altitude of 15,000 ft in only 6 minutes and 42 seconds. However, the range was only 240 miles, which meant that it mostly functioned as a defensive plane. In June 1942, the Kittyhawk flown by 24-year-old Flt. Sgt. Dennis Copping crashed in the North African desert, 200 miles away from the closest town. It remained there undisturbed until a Polish oil company worker found it in May 2012. Unfortunately, the fate of the pilot remains a mystery to this day.
The Wreckage Of A Kittyhawk P-40 In The Sahara Desert
The Cau Vang Golden Bridge Sits On Two Massive Stone Hands
Vietnam is, without a doubt, one of the most interesting yet unexplored countries in the Eastern hemisphere. Big cities like Hanoi are located right beside dense jungles, so tourists can visit many sites in only a couple of days. One of the most fascinating architectural structures across the country would be the Cau Vang Golden Bridge. It is a long bridge held up by a pair of huge stone hands. It was designed by TA Landscape Architecture and can be found atop the Ba Na Hills, close to Da Nang. Visitors can visit it without a problem, but they will need to ride a cable car to get to the top of the hill.
The Cau Vang Golden Bridge Sits On Two Massive Stone Hands
A Toaster From The 1920s
What could be better than a piece of toast? Some might even say that it is the best thing since… wait for it… sliced bread. After electricity was introduced, many fun inventions started to pop up everywhere. One such creation would be the early toaster in this photo. It can do what your toaster does, but it does the job differently. It does not toast both sides at the same time but only heats a single side of the bread each time. The users need to watch the bread to ensure that it is just as crispy as they want. Once they do that, they will flip it over and toast the other side to do the same thing.
A Toaster From The 1920s

Leon Panetta Offered To Open A $10,000 Bottle Of Wine For Osama Bin Laden’s Head
After the terrible events that went down on September 11, 2001, Osama Bin Landen was considered public enemy number one of the West. Everyone wanted to locate the Taliban ringleader and enact justice to restore the honor of the country. We know that there was at least one restaurateur who put a bounty on his head. Ted Balestreri of California jokingly said that he would open his 141-year-old Chateau Lafite Rothschild bottle with the US Secretary of Defense if they contributed to the death or capture of the terrorist. After Bin Laden was taken down in 2011, the restaurateur said that it would be his honor to uncork the bottle as part of the celebration.

Leon Panetta Offered To Open A $10,000 Bottle Of Wine For Osama Bin Laden’s Head

This 16th Century Ring Turns Into An Astronomical Sphere

This 16th-century ring can unfold into a geometrical shape and is mind-boggling if you think about it. This intricate ring was designed to be worn around a finger as it folds out into several smaller rings. How fascinating is that? The maker of the ring must have spent days, maybe even weeks, to ensure that this incredible piece of jewelry works this way. Of course, it is also possible that they first made several prototypes before they arrived at just the right configuration. Maybe they even had to come up with a detailed blueprint before they started the actual construction of the ring.

This 16th Century Ring Turns Into An Astronomical Sphere


Whiskey Legend Jack Daniel Died After Kicking His Safe Out Of Frustration

Wow, talk about a way to go. Alcohol industry legend Jack Daniel died after an ordeal with his safety in Lynchburg, Tennessee on October 9, 1911. The safe did not fall on him nor did he try detonating it with dynamite. No, he wanted to fetch paperwork inside of it but could not remember the code! He started to kick it, which did not do anything but give him an infection on the big toe. It later turned gangrenous and then spread to the other parts of his body. The good thing was that he was able to turn the business over to Lem Motlow, his favorite nephew before he died from complications.
Whiskey Legend Jack Daniel Died After Kicking His Safe Out Of Frustration

This 1867 Sewing Machine Was The First Of Its Kind
Walter Hunt worked on the sewing machine in his very own workshop on Amos Street in New York City from 1832 to 1834. The first iteration of the machine had been built by hand and came with a curved needle as well as a shuttle to interlock a stitch using two threads. The next 30 years would bring the sewing machine a lot of changes and updates that helped revolutionize the world of fashion. In those days, there were also a lot of copycat inventors who wanted to get their hands on the first patent on the machine. There was so much legal drama that it went on to be one of the most litigated inventions of the 19th century!

This 1867 Sewing Machine Was The First Of Its Kind


This Ornate Ax Was Made In Germany In The Late 1500s
The craftsmanship that it took to make the ax is inspiring. It makes us wish we were alive during the days when blacksmiths worked in their forges for hours on end. The short-handled ax boasts of many uses such as throwing or chopping, but there is something about this piece that makes us think that it was meant to be used for decoration. After all, how can you take such a beautiful thing with you into battle only to throw it at the enemy? There is a good chance that the owner would not get it back after that. We are sure that there are better tools out there for this job.


This Ornate Ax Was Made In Germany In The Late 1500s

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